matthew inman Archive

The World is Flattened …and the how Internet squashed it

By Matthew Inman “There are no bosses, no board of directors, no stockholders, and no political rules. Each group of people accessing the Internet is responsible for its own machine and operation of its own section of the network. The Internet belongs to everyone and no one.” This may seem like the mission statement of [&hellip

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The Other Greenhouse Effect: How Kenyon students are heating up the world of entrepreneurship

By Matthew Inman College students are not typically known for their motivation. The prevailing stereotype is probably closer to some sort of beer-guzzling sloth, reveling in the absence of adult supervision by doing everything their parents never let them do. Students at Kenyon College, however, are trying to prove this image false by pursuing their [&hellip

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Inside Jokes, Outside Laughs: How sites gain popularity by creating universal “inside” jokes

By Matthew Inman A smiling group of friends huddles together to pose for a snapshot commemorating their spring break at the beach. After a few seconds, the enthusiastic smiles turn to confused looks as the photographer realizes the digital camera has been taking a video of the scene the whole time. The resulting movie is [&hellip

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Edison Nation gets inventors’ ideas off the ground and onto shelves

By Matthew Inman There are countless people around the world who walk into a store or flip on the television one day only to see a product they thought up months or even years before. They inevitably say, “hey, that was my idea!” as if uncovering a conspiracy. But an invention needs more than the [&hellip

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Eyes on the Prize: Stem Cell Science Takes Two Giant Steps Forward

By Matthew Inman Recently, the world of stem cell research has been celebrating the achievement of two huge milestones that may very well help in the ongoing debate on the usefulness and morality of this type of scientific study. First, in Japan, scientists were able to grow a retina in a laboratory, a breakthrough that [&hellip

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